Mr Vine Tasting 4

Well, the team got together at 10 Greek Street back in June and as well as an almighty feast we managed to taste and rate some wines.

Here’s our top 5

First place: Magpie Estate Riesling 2014 (Eden Valley, Australia; 12.5%; £11.00, wine2drink)

The impressive result of a partnership between Barossa Valley winemaker Rolf

Binder and UK wine merchant Noel Young. Great fruit purity – salt, lime and orange

blossom – as well as a flinty character. Long, dry, lean and lip-smackingly fresh; a

laser-sharp thirst-quencher. Good value too. It’s even got a beautiful label. 91


*This was far and away my favorite wine of the tasting. If you have been afraid to try Riesling for fear of running into residual sugar then plump for an Aussie from the Eden or the Clare Valley. Super stuff!

Second place: Calusari Pinot Noir 2013 (Viile Timisului, Romania; 12.5%; £7.50, wine2drink)

This is made by Cramele Recaş a winery in western Romania now owned by

Bristolian Philip Cox. It has classic Pinot Noir character, plenty of ripe redcurrant and

earthy cherry fruit. It’s lighter on its feet than many French Pinots at this price, and

very easy to drink. An interesting find and a good example of the quality and value

currently to be found in Romania. 86 points.

* I didn’t enjoy this Pinot as much as the rest of the panel. Found it a bit chemical but that blew off and despite it still being a bit reedy and thin is an interesting wine to be sure.

Third place: Mas de Daumas Gassac ‘Réserve de Gassac’ Blanc 2011 (Languedoc, France; 13.0%; £9.75, wine2drink)

A blend of 25% Viognier, 25% Chardonnay, 25% Petit Manseng, 15% Chenin Blanc

and 10% of various other varieties from one of the Languedoc’s best producers.

Aromas of fuzzy white peach and a heavy perfume of white flowers floats from the

glass. It has a creamy, lush mouthfeel, impressive purity of fruit and a soft, floral,

dry finish. Nicely balanced and refreshingly different. Great value for under a tenner.

89 points.

* I love the sheer voluptuousness of stone fruit on show in this bottle but there’s freshness too. A real Mae West of a wine. Mas de Daumas Gassac has a had a cult following for some years now. Not everyone is a fan, but why argue Mae?

Fourth place: Greywacke Sauvignon Blanc 2013 (Marlborough, New Zealand; 13.0%; £16.00, wine2drink)

There are so many New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs on the market that these days it’s

rare to find one that really stands out. This one however, made by Kevin Judd,

former winemaker at Cloudy Bay, is exceptional. There’s vivid asparagus, cut grass,

aloe and gooseberry flavour, but it’s not overblown like some of its compatriots.

Fragrant, crisp, balanced and incredibly long, this is a very accomplished New

Zealand Sauvignon. 89 points.

* I don’t tend to drink NZ Sauvignon Blanc. Nothing wrong with the wines. But perhaps at some point they just got a bit too cookie cutter. Not the case with this one. Sure the price tag is higher than your Oyster Bay but the quality and individuality of it shines through.

Fifth place: Domaine Des Cigalounes 2011 (Lirac, France; 15.0%; £11.56, Wineman)

After the two champion Liracs we had last month, here’s another on that hit the

spot. A blend of 60% Grenache, 25% Syrah, 15% Mourvèdre, this has plenty of

blackberry, hung game and dense black cherry on the nose. It’s loaded with local

garrigue (wild herb) character which provides a herbal lift to the ripe, potent fruit. A

complete and delicious foodie wine that’s like having several courses all at once. 88


* Love the names of some the Chateaus in France. Cigalounes just cries out to be the name of a whisky distillery in the Highlands or Jura. Not as good as the table-topping Liracs from our last tasting be good enough to make the top 5.

Fatourada fi Greek Liqueur

The manner in which this artesian Greek liqueur actually came into my possession sounded a bit like a dodgy first draft of an espionage/crime short story. It would be called:

Mr Drink ‘N’ Eat and the mysterious Greek Fatourada

My name is Mister, Mr Drink n Eat. I am a private palate for hire. It was August 2013 and I was minding my own business when I was got message (via Facebook) from a woman named Vicky Peristanoglou (sounded Greek) to see if I was interested in trying Fatourada fi. I had never heard of it. But it was unusual stuff, exotic; my interest was peaked. It all seemed pretty innocent so far, but the wrinkle came when I asked how she would get it to me. I was told mailing it was complicated and dangerous. I wondered why? She had valid reasons, but it could have been a smokescreen.

A few months later I got word that it finally had arrived in the UK, and I would be contacted with more information. One afternoon my phone buzzed with a text from someone named Eric who claimed to have the Fatourada in his possession. He wanted to meet. Who was this ‘Eric’? What did he have to do with Vicky P and the Fatourada? Over the coming months as it seemed difficult to arrange a suitable meeting time with him in London. Why couldn’t I tie this guy down? What was his game?

Finally, the big day arrived with the swap due to go down at 14:30 GMT at Cabin wine bar, Waterloo station. It needed to be someplace public; I had made that mistake before. I decided to arrive early to get the drop on him. Taking a seat at a high bar table gave me a full view of the whole station. Ordering a glass of wine and a bite to eat I scanned the crowd, my senses alert. My courier arrived some minutes later in the form of a Greek economics student named Eric (spooky). Early twenties, well groomed, intelligent and from a good family as far as I could tell. He sat and handed over the package, but then asked me to choose him a glass of wine (was this a test?), so I did. He seemed happy with it and we exchanged pleasantries for a half hour or so, then he said goodbye and left disappearing into the crowded station. I wondered if I would see him again. I guess it didn’t matter because when I opened the bag, it contained a rather fetching looking bottle with a liquid inside the colour of melted amber. I couldn’t help noticing cinnamon stick tied to the neck. Could it be a message? But there was more… A plain envelope with Mr Nathan Nolan (an alias of mine) written in black ink. Inside was a single sheet of paper, a printed message from the producers Yiannis Koulelis and Maria Copsachilis thanking me for my interest in their product and being honored to hear my feedback. But was there’s more to it.

The case took another 6 months to close as I tried to find the right occasion to taste it. The time finally came when I met up with a fellow private palate whose tastebuds I trust more than my own. Walls, Matt Walls is his name and we drank it with our good ladies the other week. Here’s what we thought:

The nose began with a blast of citrus orchard, then hints of marzipan, maraschino cherry and digging deeper came rich notes of warm cinnamon and cardamom. But all the while I was getting sprays of fresh Sevilla orange zest. The texture is viscous and buttery (akin to some dessert wines) with a complex flavour profile. The mulled wine spices nibbled my tongue and lounged on my palate, but there was more: brandy butter, orange studded clove, waxy lemon, Christingle and an intense Cosmopolitan brûlée finish. I really liked its layers of orange spice and it was enjoyed by all paired with a walnut and caramel tart.  Coming out at 21% AVB and being so decadent perhaps its too rich to drink more than a small glass, but a small glass was all you needed. I for one felt very lucky to have tasted such a unique and well crafted elixir. Screen Shot 2014-05-28 at 12.12.12

Yiannis and Maria produce their spiced nectar by hand in small batches on the beautiful Greek island of Kythira (Kythera/Cythera). The name Fatourada itself is borrowed from a time when Venetians ruled Kythira (along with a number of other Aegean islands) with the heady libation only consumed by its wealthy elite. The base spirit made from Hamburg Muscat grapes is double distilled in their copper pot still before it is allowed to macerate with the green skins of locally hand picked oranges and cinnamon wood.

Fatourada fi is certainly the sort of thing you could imagine the Gods sipping while they lounged around Mount Olympus plotting love affairs with nymphs and battles with Hydras.

Check out their facebook page or contact them on twitter for more information.

The case of the mysterious delicious Fatourarda fi was now closed.